Foba

Foba Y.1000

The new 100-Watt fibre laser FOBA Y.1000 operates up to 40 percent faster than common 50-Watt lasers and allows for marking substrates that are usually difficult to mark with other models

M3000-UV

At the Fakuma, the international exhibition for plastics processing in Friedrichshafen, Germany, FOBA will be showcasing special marking solutions for different plastics

FEATURE

Making a mark

New regulations on unique device identifiers for medical equipment and implants are being phased in by the US Food and Drug Administration, codes that are best marked with a laser, as Rachel Berkowitz finds out

HELP (Holistic Enhanced Laser Process)

Lasers are used in different ways for processing medical devices. Laser marking machines with integrated vision systems emerged as an effective means of identifying medical components, e.g. for marking UDI compliant codes.

Innovative laser technology has become the preferred solution for marking medical devices as it enables medical device manufacturers to overcome marking challenges.

Feature

By Dave MacLellan, Executive Director, AILU

Feature

Gemma Church finds that additive manufacturing is being used to transform lives through advanced implants and guides for surgeons

Feature

Matthew Dale looks at what can be achieved by combining robots with lasers, including a novel tool for repairing jet engines being developed by Rolls-Royce

Feature

High-power blue diode lasers are becoming available that have significant advantages over traditional infrared lasers for machining metals. Greg Blackman investigates