Laserline

This article is brought to you by: 

Diode lasers - a modern tool for welding processes; advantages and applications

While cutting is a major laser application, laser welding is gathering new applications day-by-day. The current diode laser technology supports ongoing process developments and improves existing welding applications. This is driven by low investment and cost of ownership, but now process results show incredible improvements concerning spatter, homegenous welds and adaptive in-situ process control.

In many applications diode laser technology is thought of as the legitimate successor of CO2 lasers. The presentation includes some application results to demonstrate the above, along with a general update on the current range of welding applications.

This article is brought to you by: 

Optimising components and surfaces with a diode laser - generating, cladding and hardening of products

The presentation explains the different methods of generating (via additive manufacturing) and cladding products using diode lasers. Various samples are shown and discussed. In the second part of the presentation, the principle of laser hardening and its advantages compared to conventional methods are explained and demonstrated with examples.

In addition, the presentation provides updates on the latest developments in diode laser technology, and explains why an increasing number of applications can be performed with these systems. Diode lasers are more efficient than CO2, fibre and disk lasers, and therefore face brilliant outlook in the market, underlined by several independent experts.

Analysis and opinion
Feature

By Dave MacLellan, Executive Director, AILU

Feature

Greg Blackman explores advances being made in fibre lasers, now the dominant technology for material processing

Feature

Welding ship hulls is a relatively new application area for laser processing, but one where the laser can add value, as Rachel Berkowitz discovers

Feature

New high-speed laser cladding technologies are being developed that rival more traditional techniques, as Matthew Dale discovers