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24/7 laser cutting needed to meet demand

A prominent UK laser processing company has expanded its cutting division to operate on a 24/7 basis. The MTL Group made has increased capacity due to an influx of orders and to ensure that the demand is met.

The laser cutting market has been predicted to increase at a CAGR of 9.2 per cent leading to 2019 according to Global Laser Cutting Machine Market 2015-2019, a report available from reportsnreports.com.

The MTL Group currently uses nine laser cutting machines, including the largest bevel laser in the UK. The machines are all located in the company’s 300,000sq.ft manufacturing facility in Rotherham. The capacity of the cutting bay gives MTL an additional 2,000 hours of working time per week.

Karl Stewart, company sales director of MTL Group, said: ‘This increase in capacity means that we can now offer our customers an even faster turnaround for all standard cutting jobs, from the time of the order placed to the material being cut. Our delivery performance is in excess of 98 per cent’

 ‘The overall goal is to increase efficiency for our customers. This is being achieved by increasing capacity on our cutting machines, and consistently striving to provide a fast turnaround without sacrificing quality.’

MTL Group has been operating since 1995 and supplies within the UK and to Europe. The company has invested more than £6m in equipment to remain at the forefront of technological advancements, regularly updating machinery and processes.

Related Links:

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Diode laser that can cut half inch steel commercialised

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