NEWS

The best thing since sliced bread

Perten Instruments has announced that a new method for determining bread volume was approved by the American Association of Cereal Chemists – International (AACCI). The method was assessed by a collaborative study conducted by the AACCI Physical Testing Methods Technical Committee and demonstrated acceptable precision for samples with volumes ranging from 200 to 2,800mL. Results were similar to volumes determined by reference water displacement analysis.

The method uses a BVM laser topography based analyser from Perten. 'The BVM method is objective, contact-free, rapid, and simple to perform, making it well suited to the requirements of the milling and baking industries,' said Mark Bason – business development manager of Rheology for Perten Instruments. 'We are excited to offer the BVM as a replacement method to the laborious and less accurate seed displacement tests in current use at many test bake labs and commercial bakeries.'

The BVM volume analyser measures loaf dimensions and archives the results – including a 3D, rotatable image. The archived data and images can be used for further analysis, production quality control, and audit trails.

Related Links:

Perton Instruments

Twitter icon
Google icon
Del.icio.us icon
Digg icon
LinkedIn icon
Reddit icon
e-mail icon
Feature

By Dave MacLellan, Executive Director, AILU

Feature

Gemma Church finds that additive manufacturing is being used to transform lives through advanced implants and guides for surgeons

Feature

Matthew Dale looks at what can be achieved by combining robots with lasers, including a novel tool for repairing jet engines being developed by Rolls-Royce

Feature

High-power blue diode lasers are becoming available that have significant advantages over traditional infrared lasers for machining metals. Greg Blackman investigates