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Avia NX

Coherent have released the latest AVIA NX which sets a new standard for economy, reliability, and ease of use. Specifically, these new q-switched, diode-pumped, solid-state lasers offer output powers as high as 40W at 355nm, but with a substantially lower cost per watt than any other available product.  Plus, AVIA NX models are much smaller, lighter, and more robust than other UV lasers of the same power level.

These improvements have been achieved through a complete redesign of the product. This includes implementation of Coherent's patented pumping technology of the Nd:YVO4 gain medium, which delivers increased overall system efficiency (conversion of input electrical energy into usable light).  It also incorporates Coherent's latest optical mounting technology, called PermAlign 2, which is a simpler and more compact method that yields enhanced stability and greater long term reliability.  Plus, utilization of the newest generation of integrated microelectronics components enables a product which is both smaller and more reliable.  Reliability is further enhanced through implementation of Highly Accelerated Life Testing and Stress Screening (HALT/HASS) protocols during AVIA NX production. 

AVIA NX series lasers are primarily intended for materials processing applications in microelectronics fabrication and packaging.  These include PCB via hole drilling, drilling and cutting of flex materials, 3D IC chip fabrication, IC chip package trimming, as well as other processes in support of System in Package (SiP) manufacture. 

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