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Axicon array beam shapers

PowerPhotonic today announces the launch of a new family of axicon array beam shapers for use with multi-mode lasers. Capable of handling very high peak and pulsed power (<20kW CW) with very high efficiency (>98%), the arrays can be used to generate ring-shaped spots, a typical requirement for materials processing applications.

An axicon is a specialised type of lens that has a conical surface. These beam shapers have an array of axicons typically arranged in a hexagonal pattern, which in combination with a collimated multi-mode input beam form to create a ring-shaped spot. By precisely controlling the angle of the axicon and the tip radius, PowerPhotonic can adjust the ring diameter, the level of extinction in the centre of the ring, and the width of the ring.

This type of optic is only made possible by using PowerPhotonic’s unique laser machining fabrication process, which allows it to create arbitrary shapes in UV-fused silica. These beam shapers exhibit very high transmission efficiencies, up to 98%, which is a result of PowerPhotonic’s unique manufacturing process that results in an ultra-smooth low scatter optical surface.

The new family consists of a small number of readily available standard products, with low cost options to customise the key parameters of the design should the need arise. Typical applications for the axicon arrays include materials processing such as additive manufacturing and welding, laser diagnostics and research applications requiring a ring-shaped laser output.

Julian Hayes, Sales and Marketing Director of PowerPhotonic said, “we are pleased to be developing new innovative high performance solutions for users requiring precision beam shaping. This new family of axicon array optics complements and adds to our already extensive portfolio of beam shaper optics.”

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