C.0101 and C.0301

The new FOBA C.0101 and C.0301 are powerful CO2 laser markers for direct part marking. They replace the current Alltec LC100 and LC300 models, build on their predecessors’ field-proven laser technology and come along with productivity, flexibility, smooth integration and easy handling.

The new 10- and 30-watt CO2 laser markers are designed for cost effective industrial laser marking applications. The high resolution marking heads apply consistently permanent and high-resolution marks which is a key issue for reliable traceability and counterfeit protection.

From simple date codes through 2D codes to complex graphics: C.0101 and C.0301 reliably mark both simple and complex contents on a wide range of materials and products. With more laser power, compared to C.0101, the C.0301 is ideal for higher speed mark-on-the-fly applications or more demanding materials.

The high-speed marking heads of FOBA’s CO2 lasers and a choice of marking fields meet demanding throughput time requirements. Different contents are marked with print speeds up to 1,300 characters per second and line speeds up to 900 metres per minute.

32 standard beam delivery options, 4 interface options, a choice of networking communications, detachable umbilical cable and simple-to-use accessory connections provide flexible, versatile applications and easy integration. Wavelengths, scan head aperture, marking head position, IP rating, power and much more can be configured to suit individual application needs.

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