Excelitas Technologies Introduces Linos F-Theta Ronar 251mm Telecentric Lenses

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Excelitas Technologies has launched its LINOS F-Theta Ronar 251mm Telecentric Lenses for laser material processing applications including drilling, welding, cutting, structuring and additive manufacturing.

Optimized for back reflection with an entrance aperture up to 20mm, the LINOS F-Theta-Ronar 251mm telecentric lenses for 1030nm-1080nm feature a large effective focal length with low spot variation. A low-absorption coating and interchangeable, coated protective glass made of fused silica equip the new lenses for ps/fs pulsed and high-power applications up to 10 kW. The product utilizes a standard M85x1 connecting thread. It is dust-tight on the output side including protective glass for extended lens life and cost savings.

The 251mm telecentric lens product joins Excelitas’ premier LINOS F-Theta-Ronar family of lenses, which all have two main characteristics: when a beam is deflected by a scanning mirror in front of a lens, the scanned distance is proportional to the scanning angle; and the focus position over the entire scan field is always in the same plane. These lenses feature cutting-edge optical designs, coupled with the highest-grade materials and precision manufacturing to ensure ultra-precise performance for laser material processing systems.

“Our commitment to continual technology advancement drives development of new products, offering our customers increasingly precise optical lens performance for their applications,” said Matthias Koppitz, Application Engineer at Excelitas. “We are pleased to add the new F-Theta-Ronar 251mm telecentric lenses to the variety of Excelitas high-precision lenses available, helping customers meet their most sophisticated production processing needs.”

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