The F-PE80BF-DIF-C

Ophir Photonics, global leader in precision laser measurement equipment and a Newport Corporation brand, has announced the F-PE80BF-DIF-C, the newest member of Ophir's PE-C line of pyroelectric pulsed sensors ­ compact devices that provide the industry's lowest measurable energy, longest measurable pulse width, and highest accuracy.

The F-PE80BF-DIF-C is a fan-cooled laser sensor that covers a wide range of wavelengths, from 0.19µm to 2.9nm. It is designed for measuring very high energy/peak power lasers, including Nd:YAG and harmonics. The sensor measures pulses with average powers to 200W, three times higher than other products on the market. It provides energy measurement down to 0.5mJ.

An innovative BF coating and diffuser deliver the highest damage thresholds in the industry, to 50J/cm2 at 2ms.

'Ophir's PE-C family of pyroelectric sensors continues to break new ground with innovative technology that leads the industry and keeps pace with high performance applications,' said Ephraim Greenfield, CTO, Ophir Photonics.

'The F-PE80BF-DIF-C delivers average powers to 200W ­ three times that of competitors, as well as repetition rates up to 250Hz, and a maximum pulse width setting of 20ms ­ four times that of competitors.'

The PE-C laser energy sensor family is designed for high power, short pulse YAG laser and harmonic generation applications in a broad range of industries, from cosmetic surgery to fluid dynamics to cutting and welding.

These compact devices provide a user adjustable threshold, preventing false readings in noisy environments. They support repetition rates up to 25kHz and pulse widths up to 20ms.

The PE-C line of pyroelectric laser energy sensors works with most Ophir smart displays or PC interfaces, including the Nova II, Vega, and Juno. Each display features  'Smart Connector' interface that automatically configures and calibrates the display when plugged into one of the company's measurement sensors.

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