gRAY

Greenteg Gray laser power detector

greenTEG launches its gRAY laser power detector line for fast, accurate and wavelength-independent measurements. The gRAY line comprises of housed and mounted detectors as well as bare die components. The sensors are based on greenTEG’s patented thermopile technology, enabling high-precision measurements from the ultraviolet to the mid infrared range.

The new product line enables measuring laser powers up to 50 Watts with a non-accelerated response time of less than 250 milliseconds. The fast response time allows for higher productivity and throughput as well a higher measurement frequencies for increased process control.

gRAY Housed Power Heads

The power heads operate with an input voltage of 12 to 24 Volts and deliver a calibrated and normalized voltage signal from 0 to 10 Volts. For higher laser powers integrated channels for water cooling are available. The power heads are available for laser maximum powers of 5W, 10W and 50W.

gRAY Mounted Detectors

Mounted gRAY detectors are ideal for integrating into monitoring units when space is limited. Laser beams with an absolute power up to 50 Watt can be measured with a 200 ms rise time. An amplification circuit board for electrical integration is available upon request.

PCB-Mounted gRAY Detectors: Measure uW laser powers with highest accuracy

The thermally compensated PCB-mounted detector is sensitive to laser powers between 10 uW and 5 W. Integrated NTC or platinum thermistors are optionally available for temperature compensation as well as NIST/PTB traceable calibration.

gRAY Bare Die Components

Integrating bare die gRAY components into a laser source enables wavelength and angle independent power monitoring. gRAY bare die components are available in various sizes (2x2 to 30x30mm2) and can be integrated on PCBs. They are highly linear.

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