Highyag celebrates 20th anniversary

HIGHYAG Lasertechnologie GmbH (HIGHYAG) celebrated its 20th anniversary this year with a corporate event for employees and their families in September. Photos from the early years of the company and guided tours of the manufacturing facility gave an insight into the company’s history and today's highly innovative products for the laser industry.

Since its founding in 1995, HIGHYAG has stood for technological excellence in laser material processing. An important milestone in the twenty year history was the development of a laser welding head for welding with solid-state lasers in fully automated production lines in the automotive industry. Laser cutting heads, laser light cables, and beam couplers have completed the product portfolio of tools for laser material processing. In 2012, HIGHYAG set a benchmark in laser cutting technology with the introduction of the cutting head BIMO-FSC with fully-automated machine-controlled adjustment of focus diameter and focus position. In addition to product portfolio and customer portfolio, the number of employees has grown rapidly in recent years. Highly qualified employees, with wide expertise in laser technology, optics and high-precision mechanics, form the most important pillar of the company’s strong growth. Since 2013, HIGHYAG has been a wholly owned subsidiary of II-VI Incorporated. In January 2014, HIGHYAG moved to its current corporate building in Kleinmachnow, just outside of Berlin. Laser processing heads and beam delivery systems of the latest generation are manufactured in state-of-the-art production areas and marketed worldwide. As one of the leaders in the industry, HIGHYAG will continue in the future to focus on these core products and their development according to the market needs.

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