II-VI Incorporated unveils highly flexible laser materials processing head with control unit and graphical user interface

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II‐VI Incorporated has announced the introduction of its HIGHmodular processing head. This highly flexible product is typically used for laser welding and is designed with an embedded control unit that can be programmed through a graphical user interface.

The range of laser-based materials processing options is expanding, and this is driving the demand for highly versatile processing heads that achieve high productivity and process quality at a very low cost of ownership. II-VI’s HIGHmodular offers the ultimate in flexibility for focus control with an integrated 1D scanner, zoom collimation and a broad array of optics expansion modules. These features enable a near-limitless range of highly optimised laser welding tasks including battery welding for the automotive industry. 

II-VI’s HIGHmodular offers flexibility for focus control with an integrated 1D scanner, zoom collimation and a broad array of optics expansion modules.

‘The HIGHmodular’s ability to continuously adjust the focus diameter and position on the fly, not only from one workpiece to the next but also during the joining process, takes software-controlled welding to a whole new level of flexibility and productivity,’ said Dr Robert Kuba, managing director, II-VI Highyag. ‘The HIGHmodular is a perfect match for industrial lasers of up to 10kW and delivers industry-leading weld quality in a broad range of materials including aluminium, copper and steel.’

The integrated 1D scanner and zoom collimation allow the continuous adjustment of focus diameter (M) and focus position (Z) at a focal length of 50 to 120mm and with an extremely generous Z working range of 40mm. Both, the 1D scanner and zoom collimation are controlled by an intuitive graphical user interface. II-VI’s broad portfolio of products for laser-based materials processing includes laser processing heads for cutting, welding and brazing as well as laser light cables and direct diode laser engines.

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