Raylase opens North American subsidiary

The RAYLASE Group has added a new subsidiary: RAYLASE Laser Technology Inc. based near Boston, Massachusetts, USA. With a local presence in North America, RAYLASE will strengthen their position in its components and solutions for laser material processing. Industry veteran Steven Krusemark will be heading the North American operations offering sales, service and logistic support.

German RAYLASE AG is since its foundation in 1999 the international go-to expert of laser material processing technologies offering 2-Axis and 3-Axis laser scan heads, submodules and complete solutions. Since 2010 RAYLASE has been serving the Chinese market from its site in Shenzhen, leading to a major market share for laser scanning deflection units in East Asia.

“Over the recent years, we have happily observed a growing demand and reputation of our various industrial and scientific laser processing offerings in the Americas. While leading-edge performance, reliability and cost-effectiveness are paramount, our North American customers choose RAYLASE products especially for the ease of integration” explains Dr. Philipp Schön, spokesman of the board of RAYLASE AG. Steven Krusemark, President of the newly established RAYLASE Laser Technology Inc. carries on about his vision: “I am pleased to contribute my 36 years of experience in the Photonics Industry supporting existing and new customers. As part of the RAYLASE family I will be able to support OEMs, system integrators, machine builders and researchers to select the right laser scanning solutions for their specific applications and requirements.”

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