Scanlab's basiCube 14 gains strong foothold in laser marking market

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Specifically designed for the laser-marking market, countless customers worldwide have been won over by basiCube’s high dynamics and attractive price-performance ratio, thus making it a bestseller. And now the ‘new’ basiCube 14 has risen to be one of Scanlab's most demanded products. Its compatibility with 24V power sources offers integrators a further product advantage.

Since debuting in 2015, basiCube scan heads have proven themselves as superbly integratable, cost efficient systems with high write speeds. They are frequently employed as compact entry-level heads in the laser-marking sector, or for 3D printing of plastics. Consequently, this product line’s capabilities have steadily grown in recent years: Customers can now choose among 10 or 14 millimetre apertures and XY2- 100 or SL2-100 command protocols, as well as an assortment of wavelength variants. The entire product family is manufactured in Germany to the highest quality standards.

The basiCube 14 scan head’s optional ability to be powered via 24V offers a further advantage: Standard power supplies typically used in processing machines are now compatible with this scan system. That’s how Scanlab supports customers in optimizing the total cost of their machines.

'We’re very pleased by the market’s enthusiastic reception to our compact class. We make every effort to be the right solutions partner for price-sensitive standard applications, as well as highly demanding customer-specific requirements,' commented Scanlab CEO Georg Hofner on basiCube’s market success.

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