Turnkey solution for high-volume precision cutting of technical glass

4JET’s TWIN platform (Image: 4Jet Microtech)

Laser glass processing specialist 4JET microtech now offers a turnkey solution for high-volume precision cutting of technical glass. 

The solution is aimed at mass production of substrate and cover glasses in automotive- or consumer electronics applications. 

The core of the solution is the latest TWIN glass cutting system featuring PearlCut optics.

The laser system seamlessly integrates a loading/unloading system including a pick-and-place unit to separate cut parts from the mother sheet. Glass disposal, cleaning and metrology units add to the full solution. 

Despite the compact footprint the standard TWIN unit can process substrates of up to 1,200 by 800mm in size.

With cutting speeds of up to 1m/s, edge strength more than 2x compared to mechanical cutting, part precision in single digit micro meters and the ability to cut even small radii, the PearlCut™ technology enables one-step manufacturing of free shape contours. 

“Swiss Knife instead of Pizza Slicer”

The standard systems are capable to cut all common glass types including soda lime, borosilicate as well as chemically strengthened substrates up to several millimeters thickness. The software enables easy import and editing of CAD drawings.

The system`s versatility is not only used by mass manufacturers, but also by Jobshop operations like 4JET`s own MicroFab cutting service near Rosenheim, Germany. A multitude of materials and shapes is processed in small batches with fast changeover from one product to another.

4JET also offers an XL version of its solution to cut substrates of up to 3m in length, as well as the super compact CUBE system for glass drilling and thin-film patterning of sheets up to 600 x 600mm.

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