DNAam for Additive Manufacturers

British manufacturing software developer Valuechain has launched a new version of its production control software; DNAam, for Additive Manufacturers.

DNAam is the 7th version of Valuechain’s Production control offering, and is the 3rd new product launched this year as the Cheshire-based company continue to expand their product range.

The software is designed to the specific needs of additive manufacturing companies, integrating complex workflow and operations, such as build planning, comprehensive inventory management and the critical chemical analysis of powder batches and test pieces.

Tom Dawes, Valuechain CEO, said “DNAam addresses a specific problem that has emerged since the increased need for additive manufacturing.

The use of additive manufacturing has become more widespread in recent years, with companies of all sizes and sectors realising the benefits. However, ERP systems have failed to keep up with the specialised demands.

Every batch of AM powder needs to be tracked throughout its entire lifecycle; through multiple blends, manufacturing builds and powder recovery; whilst maintaining comprehensive chemical analysis at every stage.”

The Valuechain team’s first-hand experience in manufacturing companies underpins their software solutions, which support more than 300 manufacturing customers.

DNAam is the company’s first offering tailored to Additive manufacturing, but has been successfully piloted with Airbus UK and additive manufacturing specialists Zenith Tecnica, based in Auckland, New Zealand, and are looking to roll out the system to more companies, worldwide.

Tom continued, to mention, “We are always innovating new solutions that bring real tangible benefits to the manufacturing industry, and we’re proud that DNAam does exactly that”.

Specialising in using titanium parts, Zenith Tecnica are one of many companies that now use additive manufacturing as their main operation. Based in Auckland, New Zealand, the company are heavily invested in researching new technologies and new solutions. By utilising DNAam the team are looking forward to further streamlining processes, and providing even greater savings to their customers.

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