Laser beam profiling camera and Integra detectors

Gentec Electro-Optics, Inc., will soon be launching a Laser Beam Profiling Camera with an Extra-Large Aperture of 20.5 x 20.5 mm. This incredible aperture is achieved with the use of an Optical Fiber Taper that is fixed on the optical sensor. The fiber taper concentrates the beam onto an 11.3 x 11.3 mm sensor, thus resulting in a multiplication factor of 1.8. All the necessary corrections are done by the software so the user doesn’t have to calculate the corresponding beam size.

  • 4.2 MPixels
  • Extra-Large Aperture of 20.5 x 20.5 mm
  • Measure Beams as Small as 120 μm

The company has also unveiled its new generation of INTEGRA Detectors. The already popular series of Detectors with Integrated Monitor now features more Connector Options and a completely Redesigned Format.

  • Choice of USB or RS-232 Output on all the models
  • External Trigger Output available in option on the energy detectors
  • Redesigned format with Mounting Hole to secure it on your optical table

The Same Incredible Performance

Each detector of the All-in-One INTEGRA Series offers the same incredible performance as the usual detector and meter combination, from pW to kW and from fJ to J. And the good news is that nearly all our detectors are available with the INTEGRA option.

Perfect for the Lab and Field Service

Since the electronics are miniaturized and integrated within the integrated monitor, the All-in-One INTEGRA detectors are perfectly adapted for embedded laboratory applications. They are also essential tools for field service technicians that will take advantage of the integrated monitor, thus carrying less instruments.

An Advantageous Solution

One device = one calibration. When buying an INTEGRA product, you reduce your recalibration costs by half since there are no extra fees to calibrate the integrated monitor. Their small profiles also represent significant savings on required space.

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