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Raylase introduces two-axis deflection unit for solar wafer structuring

With its new Superscan IV-15 Wafer two-axis deflection unit, Raylase offers a sophisticated solution for challenging industrial applications. Predesignated applications include, in particular, the structuring of wafers in the solar industry.

This special version of the Superscan-IV-15, with its ultra-high speed, is designed to meet the high-performance requirements that apply to the manufacturing of wafers, where the highest possible angular velocity is essential. 

One trend-setting application for the Superscan-IV Wafer is the production of photovoltaic wafers using the innovative PERC technique. The International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) predicts that this technology will have a global market share of over 45 per cent by 2025. PERC wafers consist of solar cells with a passivated emitter and passivated rear side. They are capable of reflecting light at wavelengths above 1,180 nm, resulting in less heat development in the cell and a significantly higher efficiency of conversion into usable energy.

Raylase has optimized the Superscan IV-15 specifically for these applications to enable the high-quality yet time- and cost-efficient production of these powerful PERC photovoltaic wafers. The Superscan IV-15's model-based, digital control offers extremely high speeds of up to 200 rad/s.

Speed and dynamic responses are guaranteed, thanks to digital control and powerful PWM output stages. When combined with the Raylase camera adapter and MVC components, the Superscan IV-15 is the perfect precision tool with process monitoring.

The robust, water-cooled master block design enables applications at up to 2 kW laser power when quartz mirrors are used. The deflection unit can be controlled digitally both via the XY2-100 enhanced protocol and via the SL2-100 protocol. The input aperture is 15 mm. Lenses with optimized holders and scan mirrors are available for all standard laser types, wavelengths, power densities, focal lengths and processing areas. Custom solutions can also be provided.

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